Chocolate Ice Cream Roll Cake: A Versatile Holiday Recipe

chocolate ice cream roll cake

I have been making this sponge chocolate ice cream roll cake for over 4 decades. It has become a favorite holiday recipe and even the in-laws and grand kids ask for it each holiday. It was passed down to me from an Aunt and I hope my own daughters eventually make it to keep it in the family. For now, they will assume it’s my job!

  Here’s what I like about my chocolate ice cream roll cake

  • I love that it can be made in advance of the holiday. Whip it up and put in the freezer.  I’d say it could freeze for months, but it will most likely never last that long.
  • I call this a chameleon recipe because it can be changed so many ways to suit dietary needs or taste buds.  You can use a gluten free flour mix and make it a gluten free recipe. After cutting out most wheat, I have used gluten free baking flour for this recipe and no one can tell the difference. I still get a treat and no one is the wiser. You can also use lactose free ice cream and make it lactose free as well. You can even modify this recipe and make it a vanilla roll or put a different flavor of ice cream in the roll. There’s pretty much something for everyone.
Chocolate Ice Cream Roll Cake (about 10 servings, 
depending on your greediness)

Ingredients:

6 eggs, separate the egg whites into one bowl and the egg yolks
into a second bowl
1/2 tsp. cream of tartar
1 cup granulated sugar
4 Tbsp. cocoa
4 Tbsp. sifted flour
1/4 tsp. salt
1 tsp. vanilla
confectioner’s sugar-have at least a cup to spread on foil
and use to wrap up the roll
About 3 cups of ice cream

Get ready to bake the cake

Preheat the oven to 325 ⁰. Grease a 15.5 x 10.5 jelly roll pan with vegetable spray. On top of that, insert a piece of wax paper onto the pan and spray that as well.

Beat the egg whites until stiff and add ½ tsp. cream of tartar. Gradually beat in ½ cup sugar. Set aside.  Beat the egg yolk until thick. Add ½ cup sugar. Mix the cocoa and flour and add to the yolk mixture. Mix and then add the salt and vanilla. Fold the egg yolk mixture gently into the egg white mixture.

Spread in the well greased jelly roll pan. Bake for 20-25 minutes, just until the surface springs back when touched lightly with finger (be sure to avoid over baking as it will crack while rolling up).  Loosen the edges with a knife and then immediately turn upside down on a large sheet of foil that is sprinkled with a generous amount of confectioner’s sugar. At this point, layer your ice cream on top (don’t wait for it to cool). I usually put at least a quarter inch of ice cream across the top, but it can be more. If the sponge cake starts to stick on the foil, just roll some confectioner’s sugar on that as well.

IMG_3106

The warm sponge cake topped with ice cream and ready to roll up.

To make this a vanilla roll, I just replace the 4 Tbsp. cocoa with 2 Tbsp. of flour (so a total of 6 Tbsp. flour) and follow the rest of the recipe.

~200 calories, 8 g fat, 30 g carbohydrate, 5 g protein~ Happy Easter

 

Without Wheat: Blueberry Streusel Teff Muffins

teff flour muffins

I decided to finally try using the teff flour I bought months ago. Muffins always seem like a forgiving baked product, so I started with a muffin recipe. It seems as though a lot of the available recipes require another flour in addition to the teff flour. The flour can make a drier product so a recipe that has sweet potatoes, bananas, applesauce, and berries would seem to be a good fit. I took a conventional recipe and modified the flours.

Why bother with teff

I am trying to cut back on wheat as I seem to be very sensitive to it. That said, I absolutely love eating my carbohydrates so some experimentation was in order. Teff is a fine grain that is versatile. It grows in African countries, but is also grown in this part of the world-Idaho of all places! For those needing to eat gluten free (not just wheat free), teff fits the bill as well. While I used this product in muffins, it can be added to waffles, other baked goods, cooked cereals, and stews.

Nutritionally speaking

This grain is high in minerals like iron and magnesium. It’s a good source of calcium, zinc, selenium, and some B vitamins. In addition to being a good source of vitamins and minerals, it provides both protein and fiber. A 3/4 cup of cooked teff provides 6.5 g of protein and 4 g of fiber. For more detailed nutrition information and recipes, the whole grain council offers extensive information on all whole grains along with some other interesting recipes, including some additional interesting teff recipes.

Blueberry Teff Muffins With Streusel Topping

Great muffin recipe using teff flour.
Prep Time8 mins
Cook Time22 mins
Servings: 12
Calories: 199kcal

Equipment

  • Oven

Ingredients

  • ¼ c canola oil
  • 1 c skim milk
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla
  • 1 whole egg
  • 1 c teff flour
  • 1 c Bob's Red Mill 1 to 1 Gluten Free Flour
  • c sugar
  • 1 Tbsp baking powder
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ¾ c frozen organic blueberries thawed and well drained

Streusel Topping

  • 2 Tbsp flour
  • 1 Tbsp butter
  • 2 Tbsp brown sugar

Instructions

  • Heat oven to 400°. Generously grease or spray a 12 muffin pan.
  • Mix the oil, milk, vanilla, and egg together.
  • Stir in both flours, sugar, baking powder, and salt until moistened.
  • Fold in the drained blueberries.
  • Divide the batter into the 12 muffin cups.
  • Mix the streusel topping ingredients together. Sprinkle it on top of the muffins.
  • Bake for 20-25 minutes. Remove from the pan immediately.

Notes

Nutrition Information: 199 calories, 6 g fat, 30 g carbohydrate, 4 g protein.
As is the case with most muffins, these freeze great.

If you are looking to experiment with another wheat free flour, try my buckwheat muffin recipe.These muffins are really a hit with clients and they have a touch of sweetness from the chocolate chips. They are a personal favorite of mine for freezing to grab for a quick breakfast on the run.

Have you used Teff flour in a baked product?

Without Wheat: Buckwheat Flour Muffins

Buckwheat muffins with chocolate chips

Buckwheat flour muffins with chocolate chips

I started my life without wheat by making buckwheat flour muffins

Personally, I REALLY enjoy eating whole grains. And, I used to eat a ton of wheat. Sadly, my wheat days are basically over due to my food sensitivity testing. I started weaning myself from wheat by making these buckwheat flour muffins.

For others, it may be apersonal decision to pull back because you need or want to be gluten-free (products labeled gluten free are also wheat free). Whatever the circumstances, there are definitely some grain alternatives out there for those that love whole grains. I started living without wheat by making the pictured buckwheat flour muffins. The verdict was they were delicious!

Keep in mind that two of these grains noted here are not gluten-free, only wheat free or differing in the gluten profile. Barley, rye, wheat, and oats that are not processed in a dedicated gluten free facility are not allowed on a gluten free diet. For those choosing to live without the ubiquitous wheat found in standard grocery stores, the challenge is to find alternative products that may be better tolerated.

Here are some other wheat-free options:

Rye

Most commercial store brands of rye bread actually contain wheat. For instance, Pepperidge Farm rye bread notes: unbromated unbleached enriched wheat flour as the first ingredient, followed by water, then rye. To find a rye bread made entirely of rye flour, you may need to go to a bakery. In the Chicago area suburbs, there is a little bakery that only uses rye flour. For those going “wheatless”, breads using only rye flour are a delicious alternative. Don’t assume every bakery uses just rye flour, you will need to ask the staff.

Spelt

Spelt is an ancient grain. According to one bakery website (kolateksbakery.com), spelt needs more steps to harvest and then bake, so it fell out of favor and eventually took a back seat to our now popular wheat. Spelt is technically part of the wheat family, but it possesses a different gluten profile. Those with a wheat sensitivity may be able to tolerate spelt better than wheat. I found this bakery’s Tata bread to be very “normal tasting” and almost reminiscent of whole wheat bread days!

Buckwheat

buckwheat muffin recipe

Here’s an actual gluten-free alternative. It’s actually not a grain, which is why there is no gluten! It’s a type of seed called a pseudo-cereal. I’m trying to get in the kitchen a bit more making my own wheat-free alternative foods, because so many of the commercial mixes are just way too high in sugar and calories. Here’s a great buckwheat muffin recipe:


1.5 cups buckwheat flour
¾ cups oatmeal (use gluten-free oats for a GF diet)
2 tsp. baking powder
½ tsp. salt
1 cup skim milk or milk of choice
2 tbsp. oil of choice
¼ cup applesauce
1 mashed banana
2 tsp. vanilla
2 eggs
½ cup chocolate chips

Combine ingredients. Mix until moistened.  Bake at 350º for 18-20 minutes. Yields 12 muffins. 150 calories per muffin; 5 g protein, 23 g carbohydrate, 5 g fat

There are other grains to try such as Teff which is gluten-free as well.  Anyone else have experience focusing on these grains along with great recipes?