Diet Savvy Strategies

 Between “Dr. Google” and all the nutrition books available, it’s no wonder people are confused on how to get on track with healthier eating. Many clients tell me it seems the recommendations are always changing, and it makes for a lot of confusion on how to actually eat well. In reality, eating well is not difficult if you can remember some simple steps and strategies to get started. By following these eating strategies, it’s almost a guarantee that your diet will improve.

  • Add plenty of brightly colored fruits and vegetables to your diet all day and each day. Fruits and vegetables are loaded with anti-inflammatory compounds that can lessen your risk for diseases such as cancer and heart disease. The more colorful your diet, the richer your diet is in anti-inflammatory compounds.
  • Decrease your animal protein intake. Most people eat way too much animal protein. By decreasing your animal protein, you are decreasing your fat consumption which can be a good thing if you are trying to manage your weight.  Even if you are not trying to manage your weight, cutting down on animal protein will decrease saturated fat which can lessen inflammation. And your kidneys, they can benefit from a lower protein intake as well because they do not need to work so hard!
  • Limit your restaurant and carry out food.  I have never met a client that was able to lose weight and eat restaurant/carry out food on a daily basis. Consumer beware: most restaurant/carryout food is higher in sodium, calories, and fat than the counterpart item prepared at home. Check menus and nutrition information in advance of dining out. I had a client recently that ordered a so-called healthy salad at a chain restaurant thinking it was a good choice; unfortunately, the calories clocked in at 1400. It’s a good thing she expended a lot of calories that day!
  • Take advantage of convenience foods at the grocery store. I guarantee a Healthy Choice, Kashi, or even Lean Cuisine frozen dinner is going to stack up with less calories, sodium, and fat that your average carry out meal. Plus, it’s all portion controlled so if you are tired, you don’t need to think too much. Add a healthy beverage and a fruit/vegetable and your meal will be pretty nutritionally rounded.
  • Meals can be large snacks and you don’t NEED to cook.  Is it a problem to eat cereal for dinner? I don’t think so!  Have that cereal with milk or a milk alternative, some fresh fruit, an it’s a rather nutritionally adequate and satisfying easy meal. By choosing a higher fiber unsweetened cereal you have improved the quality of your meal dramatically. Not into cereal for dinner, then try a simple fruit smoothie made with some milk for another nutrient dense snack. Ever think of adding cottage cheese to the smoothie? It makes the smoothie taste like cheesecake!

Once you get used to these simple strategies, you will see how easy healthy eating can be!

What are your healthy eating strategies?

Turkey Scraps: Try This New Comfort Food Recipe

Those turkey scraps that don’t fit nicely on a serving platter for Thanksgiving lend themselves very well to a favorite family recipe of mine. I would put these croquettes in the “comfort food” category. They are easy to make, use up all your leftover meat scraps, and are a healthy meat entrée. Enjoy the whole traditional bird on Thanksgiving, then enjoy this great leftover dish later in the week.Turkey Dinner

Take all those scraps of turkey and place into a food processor or a blender.  This recipe calls for about 2 cups of shredded meat.  The meat mixture will be mixed with a light roux sauce to bind it and then baked in the oven for a healthier alternative to a traditional fried croquette recipe.

 

For the croquette meat mixture you will need:

2 cups of chopped or shredded leftover turkey

dash of salt and pepper

1 tsp. lemon juice (optional)

1 tsp. chopped parsley (optional)

Combine these ingredients in a mixing bowl and set aside.

Next, make the light roux sauce.  You will need:

4 Tbsp. butter
1/3 cup flour
1/4 tsp. salt
dash of pepper
1 cup milk

Melt the butter in a saucepan.  Add the flour and seasonings and blend.  Slowly add the one cup of milk, stirring continually with a wire whisk until the mixture thickens.  After the mixture thickens, add into the chopped meat mixture. You want the mixture to be firm enough to shape, so use only part of the sauce mixture initially, and then added the rest as needed.  It is helpful to chill the mixture for awhile in order to allow for shaping the mixture into firmer patties.

After the roux sauce and chopped meat are mixed together, shape your croquettes into eight hamburger like patty shapes.

The next step is to coat the croquette patties with the bread crumbs.  You will need:

1 cup fine bread crumbs
1/4 cup butter
one egg with 1 tbsp. water or alternatively you may use eggbeaters

Place the butter in a shallow baking dish and melt.  Dip the croquettes into the bread crumbs, egg, and then back into the bread crumbs.  Next place the breaded croquettes into the melted warm butter and coat all sides. Preheat the oven to 350 ° and bake for about 30 minutes until crisp.  This can be served with a dollop of any leftover roux sauce if not needed for the croquette mixture.  Garnish with a sprig of parsley and enjoy that turkey again.

Nutrition information per croquette:

200 calories

9 grams of fat

15 grams of protein

15 grams of carbohydrate

360 mg sodium

 

Tip:  If you would like to decrease the fat and calorie content further, skip rolling the bread coating mixture in the melted butter.  Turkey scraps can also be frozen to make this recipe at a later time. And, no turkey?  This recipe also works very well with leftover chicken.  Bon appetit!Those turkey scraps that don’t fit nicely on a serving platter for Thanksgiving lend themselves very well to a favorite family recipe of mine.  Take all those pieces of turkey and place into a food processor or a blender.  This recipe calls for about 2 cups of shredded meat.  The meat mixture will be mixed with a light roux sauce to bind it and then baked in the oven for a healthier alternative to a traditional fried croquette recipe.

 

 

 

Magnesium: Would You Benefit from a Supplement?

supplements from a bottleMagnesium is everywhere in our diet: it is fairly abundant in green leafy vegetables, peas, broccoli, nuts, seeds, lentils, whole grains, fish, and bananas and even tap water. With that stated, most references will state that there is only a small percentage of people in the US not meeting their magnesium requirement. Interestingly, when my nutrition college students would assess their diets with nutrition analysis software, they almost never consumed the required 300-400 mg. of magnesium.  So, I guess that begs the question of what “nutritional” camp are you in? Do you implement healthy eating and try to eat a variety of foods on a regular basis, or do you shun whole grains, fruits, vegetables? Perhaps you are trying to eat a healthy diet, but have opted to decrease your carbohydrate intake along the way, which can also impact your consumption of magnesium rich foods since many carbohydrate rich foods are sources of magnesium.

Medical conditions thought to benefit from supplementation include:

  • Alcoholism
  • Type 2 Diabetes
  • Gastrointestinal problems such as celiac disease, Crohn’s disease, and GERD treated with certain medication
  • Menstrual pain
  • Coronary heart disease
  • Hearing loss
  • Hypertension
  • Leg cramps in pregnancy

And lastly, and big on my personal list, is the pain of fibromyalgia. There are times when the pain needs to be attacked from all angles to become manageable. I am all too familiar with this pain and the impact on daily life since I have it. Most of the time I manage fairly well, but sometimes with extreme stress it will rear it’s very ugly head. Recent events in my life seemed to have triggered the pain to a increased level for an extended time period. I will now begin supplementing with magnesium as one type of adjunct therapy for my pain. There are many prongs of intervention and management for fibromyalgia, so keep in mind this is not meant to be a sole treatment recommendation for everyone suffering from fibromyalgia, only one potential aspect of management. Again, there are many aspects of management-far too many to address is this blog.

For those deciding to take a magnesium supplement for any reason, there are some guidelines to keep in mind as not all supplements are created equally. When selecting a supplement, you want to try and ascertain the product actually contains the labeled amount of magnesium, is untainted with contaminants, and it breaks apart for digestion. And lastly, cost per pill may be an issue. While you can figure out the cost per pill with a calculator, the rest of the list is a bit murkier to sift through. The vitamin industry is self-regulating, so go with a name brand as quality control will be high on their list oUSP logof concerns.  You can also look for the term USP or the USP logo on a supplement labels which assures the nutrient will actually be absorbed rather than passing though your body undigested with no benefits.

Additionally, keep these points in mind:

  • MAGNESIUM OXIDE-economical, but absorbed less effectively; may cause diarrhea in susceptible individuals
  • MAGNESIUM CITRATE AND MAGNESIUM CHLORIDE may be formulas that are better absorbed and may have fewer side effects if taken at higher dosages.

Lastly, remember these supplements are meant to supplement the magnesium you are consuming through your diet. If you are not clear on the amount of supplement you might benefit from, consult a qualified dietitian for advice.

Have magnesium supplements helped you with any of your medical concerns? Do you have a brand you trust?

 

 

 

The Easter Egg Hunt: Keeping Safe at the Plate

kids with eggs dyingThe egg hunt is on! Families all over the country will buy, dye, and hunt for eggs in the next few hours.  It is a fun tradition, and the eggs can easily be eaten as a snack, breakfast, or added to salad if they are handled properly pre and post coloring.

A hard boiled egg has only but 80 calories, but is rich in many nutrients, including protein, phytochemicals, many B-complex vitamins, and vitamins A, D, and E. If eggs are from chickens fed an omega-3 rich feed, the hatched eggs will also contain omega-3 fatty acids which we need more of in the American diet.  Another nutritional perk of eggs hatched in 2016, is they are significantly lower in cholesterol.  Today’s eggs have an average of only 180 mg. of cholesterol, down from about 220 mg. cholesterol in years past!

Here are ten tips to keep those eggs safe to eat after Easter.

  1. When purchasing your eggs, make sure there are no broken or dirty eggs The shell keeps the inside of the eggs free of bacteria and a broken shell can allow for bacterial contamination.
  2. Be sure to check the date stamped on the carton.  Avoid purchasing eggs which are stamped with a “sell by” date close to the purchase date.
  3. After purchasing, eggs should be refrigerated immediately at 40° or less.  Avoid putting eggs in the refrigerator door, as temperatures will be inconsistent and may not meet temperature guidelines.
  4. For eggs already in your refrigerator, you may safely use them for both coloring and eating even if the sell-by date has already passed.  In fact, they can be safely eaten 2-4 weeks past that stamped “sell by” date.  If your eggs are typically stored in another container in the refrigerator, and you have no idea how long they have been there, it is best to pitch them and start with fresh eggs for coloring if you plan on eating them.
  5. Consumers should not wash egg shells prior to hard boiling.  When the chicken lays an egg it has a protective film coating to protect the inside of the egg.  Washing the shell can actually remove that protective film, and hasten the likelihood of bacteria moving into the egg.
  6. Cook the eggs thoroughly.  For directions on how to cook a hard boiled egg, visit:  http://www.incredibleegg.org/recipes/recipe/easy-hard-boiled-eggs
  7. After cooked, the eggs may be dyed but must be refrigerated within 2 hours.
  8. Be sure to use a food safe dye if you plan on eating your Easter eggs.
  9. Do not plan on eating Easter eggs which have been placed on the ground.  This becomes a perfect recipe for making you ill as the bacteria from the ground can enter the cooked egg.  Stick with the plastic version for egg hunting in the yard.
  10.  If you are hiding real Easter eggs, pick clean areas to hide them inside your home.  Eggs can only safely be left unrefrigerated for 2 hours, so keep your egg hunt to no more than 2 hours.  Leftover Easter eggs should be eaten within 7 days as long as they have been properly handled and refrigerated.

kids with eggs

Does your family do anything special with leftover Easter eggs?

Food Games: Do you Play?

Chess pieces on chessboardAre you a master at deception? Are you always having a conversation with yourself that manages to sabotage your newest efforts to finally lose weight?  If so, chances are pretty good that you have a dialogue in your head that needs to change.  If you are having the following self conversations, it’s best to redirect your dialogue to help you win at weight loss.

The Clean-Plate Game.  You know this game:  eat it all up because some people are starving!  If you eat up all the food when not hungry, you are not helping anyone that is starving!  Or, you paid for it so you must eat it.  At home, put less food on your plate.  In a restaurant, ask for the people box prior to digging into the large plate of food, and acknowledge that while you still paid for it, you now have food for another meal so you doubled your value.

Skipping Breakfast Game:  You think you will eat less overall calories by limiting what you consume in the morning. Many studies indicate that when people do this, they manage to consume more total calories in a given day.  Other studies show that when people consume substantial calories in the morning, they use those calories to meet energy requirements more efficiently, and store less of that energy in fat cells.  Consuming the bulk of your calories at the tail end of the day is less productive for your body weight and energy levels.  You will just be hungry and crabby all day, and may over indulge at night.

Dining and Taking Out Food Game.  Do you really know what is happening in the kitchen of your favorite restaurant and take-out place?  I would venture to guess that this food has much more fat, calories, and sodium than you would find in your own kitchen.  Try to limit relying on outside sources for your food unless you are able to confirm with nutrition labels that it is a healthy option.

It’s for Company Mantra Game! There are many variations to this one: there is also “It’s for the kids.”  Do the M & Ms really need to be in a bowl for your grandchildren and shouting to you all the time? I have grandchildren too, but I would not have a candy bowl sitting out all the time, because I certainly like the chocolate at well.  Get the treats for kids, grandchildren, and company, but keep a limited stock that is purchased just prior to their arrival or hidden away with little access.  Better yet, get a treat that does not pose a high temptation threat to you!

The Game of Willpower.  I don’t feel that most people successful at weight loss can use the power of willpower.  Over the long haul, they should instead think “smart” on eating strategies:  keep a clean kitchen free of high temptation foods, keep small amounts or portion controlled foods that you conceptualize as treats, or if food is just too tempting to avoid once in your kitchen, just don’t put it into your grocery cart in the first place.  Willpower, in my book, is a short-term bandage fix that doesn’t really last long enough to help you achieve weight loss.

Taking a step back to evaluate the games you play in life will help you be successful at weight management.

Do you play any other games? Care to share your strategies for helping to “win”?

Belt Busters: Watch Those Drinkable Calories

MP900440312The festive month of December has arrived.  Along with extra calories from holiday cookies, candy, and restaurant fare, there are those often shrugged off or unacknowledged extra calories that creep insidiously into our diets from common holiday beverages.  Those beverages do not even need to contain alcohol, but many are alcohol based.  Without being mindful of those drinkable calories while you are humming holiday carols, you might be singing the blues come January 1.   Anyone hoping to avoid moving out a notch on the belt come January would be wise to be mindful of the extra calories from holiday beverages.  The good news is that there are some festive drinks that will do less damage to your waistline.  Your secret weapon here is to watch the portion size of your holiday beverage and be mindful of the calories contributed to your daily intake. Taking it a step further by tracking all your calories (not just thinking about them), usually ends up really helping to keep the belt notch in one spot.

Here is a sampling of those calories:

  • 4 ounces of champagne- my favorite at only 65 calories a glass
  • 1 ounce brandy-65 calories!  Consider drinking on the rocks to give the illusion of a larger serving!
  • 12 ounces non-alcoholic beer-70 calories
  • 2 ounces Martini-120 calories
  • 5 ounces of wine (red or white)-120 calories
  • 12 ounces Light beer-varies from 50 -120 calories
  • 5 ounces Bloody Mary-125 calories
  • 2.5 ounces Cosmopolitan-130 calories
  • ½ cup low-fat eggnog-150 calories
  • 12 ounces Regular beer-150 calories
  • 10 ounces Irish coffee-160 calories
  • 2.5 ounces Chocolate martini-190 calories
  • 7 ounces Gin and tonic-190 calories
  • ½ cup regular eggnog-220 calories
  • 6.5 ounces Margarita-330 calories
  • 10 ounces Hurricane-380 calories
  • 6 ounces Amaretto Sour-420 calories

Just as when selecting food for a healthy diet, portion sizes matter!  Multiple servings of some of these high calorie beverages, coupled with typical high fat snack foods often served along with these drinks will most likely blow your calorie intake to the North pole.  There’s an old saying, “ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure” so enjoy your party beverages, but think about your choices as you enjoy the holiday spirit this month.  Doing so will make for a healthy and easier transition to 2016.

How Does Your Favorite Cereal Stack Up?

 

IMG_0843

Did you know cereal is a healthy nutrient dense carbohydrate? Selecting a good breakfast cereal means you will be providing complex carbohydrates to efficiently fuel your brain and body.  A good quality breakfast cereal should have fiber and not much sugar.  I like to see a breakfast cereal with at least 3 grams of dietary fiber per serving.  Speaking of “serving”, how big is your portion? Most people actually do not mentally note the serving size on the Nutrition Facts Label and are rather shocked to find out, for instance, that a serving of Frosted Mini Wheats is just 21 pieces!   It’s ok to double your serving size, but this will be an issue if you are trying to control your calories along with other nutrients.

Thumbs Up to FiberFiber aids digestion, stabilizes blood glucose levels, aids in blood cholesterol reduction, and can offer a feeling of satiety to actually aid in weight reduction! That’s a lot of benefits from a bowlful of fiber rich cereal.

Thumbs Down to Sugar. Did you know that every 5 grams of sugar yields one teaspoon of sugar?  So, that fruity loop cereal your kids love which contains 15 grams of sugar contains 3 teaspoons of sugar per serving.  That assumes your serving size is what is noted on the box.  Pour a second bowl and you double your sugar consumption along with the calories.

Thumbs Down to Fat. A cereal is mostly complex carbohydrate and should not have much fat in it.  Some whole grain cereals will have a natural small amount of fat, but if the fat content per serving of the cereals gets too high (over 3 grams), then the assumption is fat has been added in production.  A classic example of a cereal with excessive fat per serving is Kellogg’s Crackling Oat Bran which contains 7 grams of fat per 3/4 cup serving.

Thumbs Up OR Down to Iron.  If you are a female of child bearing age, or a growing child, then enriched breakfast cereal is an excellent source of dietary iron. For everyone else, beware!  Males and older women do not need the large amount of iron in cereal.  Too much iron is constipating and also an issue if you have a common genetic condition called hereditary iron overload.  If you have been paying attention to the iron content of cereal, you know it is very difficult to find a cereal without iron.  In fact, many popular lower sugar and high fiber cereals are also loaded with iron. For instance Wheat Chex (6 grams fiber) contains over 14 grams of iron.  Cheerios contains 8 grams of iron. This is too much iron for men and older women who only need 8 mgs. per day and will be getting additional iron in the diet through other foods.

Cereals with less iron include:

  • Kashi cereals range from virtually no iron up to 2 mg depending on the variety selected
  • Puffins have less than 1 mg
  • Cooked oatmeal has less than 2 mg
  • Fiber One has 4.5 mg
  • Frosted Cheerios have 4.5 mg
  • Basic 4 has 4.5 mg
  • Flax Plus Multibran Flakes has less than 2 mg
  • All Cascadian Farm Organic cereals (my new “find”), have less than 2 mg iron

Enjoy your cereal for breakfast, snacks, and maybe even dinner, but make sure you choose one that is right for your health.

The Potential Hidden Danger in Your Cereal: Iron

IMG_0787

We all know iron is something we need to stay healthy and prevent anemia.  But did you know that too much dietary iron can hurt your health? When choosing a cereal, most people grab what tastes good.  If they are health conscious,  cereals low in calories and sugar and high in fiber might be selected.

One of the main problems with iron fortification in cereal is that the cereal is fortified for the part of the population that needs the most iron-namely women of childbearing age.  So, listen up adult males and older women: you, in particular, need to be mindful of the iron content of your favorite breakfast cereal.  When looking at a Nutrition Fact Label, note the percentage of DV iron. Looking at the above label, if a young female of child-bearing age has a 3/4 cup serving of Wheat Chex, she will be consuming 80% of her iron requirements (or about 14 grams of iron).  However, if an adult male or older woman eats 3/4 cup of the above cereal, he/she will be consuming almost double the iron recommendation of 8 grams of iron.  The fact that so much of our food supply is fortified with iron increases the risk that this hefty load of iron in a single serving of breakfast cereal could be problematic.

What exactly is the problem with eating too much iron?  Research has suggested the following:

Accelerated aging process?  Researchers recently pointed this out in worms, and will likely try to evaluate if this applies to humans;  in the interim, we already know that iron causes oxidative stress, which as far as the human body is concerned, is a negative event!  Oxidative stress in humans is thought to be involved in the development of many diseases such as cancer and heart disease.

Constipation.  Aside from being unpleasant, this is not healthy for your body.   Any toxins or food pathogens present in your food will linger in your gastrointestinal tract, and potentially threaten your overall health. There is also scientific evidence that constipation can be a risk factor for colorectal cancer.

Healthy people make a hormone, hepcidin, which swings into action to prevent too much iron from being absorbed. However, in a now common genetic condition called iron overload (or technically Hemochromatosis), the body is unable to put the brakes on iron absorption and iron begins to build up in the tissues. Early symptoms are varied and include fatigue, abdominal pain, and increased infections.  Later symptoms include liver failure and heart failure, and bone damage, and diabetes.

For those as yet undiagnosed people who are at particular risk from too much dietary iron, the iron content of generous servings of cereal are particularly troublesome.  For the rest of the males and older women, reading the nutrition fact label can help you keep your iron intake where it belongs-which is significantly less than noted on the label of most cereals on today’s supermarket shelves.

Have a favorite breakfast cereal which is low in iron? Please share for the next updated blog on which are the best low iron cereal options on the market.

 

 

February’s Favorite Food: Chocolate

Valentine’s Day is here and so are those tempting chocolates. They arrive from a friend, a child, your co-worker, or spouse and they call for you, no make that shout for you!  Should you feel guilty eating some chocolate?  Absolutely not, but the operative word in the previous statement is some.

Most of us have heard there are health benefits to chocolate.  Indeed, chocolate is highly ranked on the food chain as being very beneficial as an anti-oxidant rich food. Without getting too technical, anti-oxidants are wonderful for health because they help fight something called free radicals which cause damage to our bodies.  This damage to our bodies translates as disease and aging!

The health enhancing compounds in chocolate and cocoa are from a group of compounds called flavonoids.  Flavonoids are also found in foods such as fruits, vegetables, and even spices.

Of course, not all chocolate is created equally when it comes to health benefits. On Valentine’s Day, enjoy a piece or two of your favorite chocolate candy. But to enjoy the health benefits of chocolate all year, consider the following:

  • Move your focus to chocolate products that are not heavily processed. The processing of chocolate degrades the flavonoid content, rendering it less therapeutic in fighting diseases.
  •  Avoid cocoa products which note Dutch processing, which allows for the destruction of flavonoids by treating it with an alkali to tame the natural pungent taste of cocoa.
  • Add chocolate products to your diet that are lower in sugar and fat.  Most of us do not have a dietary need for more fat and sugar in our diets!  The fats in chocolate are not considered uniformally “bad”, but the calories from fat in chocolate remain a nutritional concern for many people.
  • We always hear that dark chocolate is better for us than milk chocolate, but it depends on how the dark chocolate was processed.  Reading the dark chocolate product label prior to purchase may be helpful in choosing a minimally processed chocolate, and therefore, healthier chocolate.

For the other 364 days of the year, a few 1 oz. servings of unprocessed chocolate per week is a great eating strategy if you need a chocolate fix.  Happy Valentine’s Day!

Homemade Chicken Soup: Oh So Good and Good For You!

chicken soup

Homemade chicken soup made in my favorite Cuisinart electric pressure cooker

It seems as though sinus infections, the stomach flu, bronchitis, and muscle aches are making the rounds in my large family and we don’t even live in the same house! I finally found both the energy and time to take out my favorite cooking equipment, my pressure cooker, to make some virus fighting fuel.  We have all heard that even canned chicken noodle soup can help fight a cold, but I was eager and ready to taste the rich flavorful type of chicken noodle soup I could make with my electric pressure cooker. At this point, I decided I would enhance the rich flavor by making the chicken stock base in my pressure cooker rather than using low sodium chicken broth.

Pressure Cooker Homemade Chicken Stock Ingredients

  • 2 pounds of chicken wings
  • small onion
  • 2 carrots
  • 2 stalks celery
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 5 parsley sprigs
  • 2 quarts water

Cook all ingredients on high pressure for 40 minutes. Use a natural release to continue extracting the flavors.  Strain the stock. Cool the stock in order to skim the fat off.  If time is short and you need to use the chicken stock before it is completely cool, use a chilled lettuce leaf to help skim the fat off the stock.  The chilled leaf will actually attract the fat in the broth to allow for removal.

On to the Chicken Soup….

  • 2 carrots, chopped
  • 2 stalks of celery, diced
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon oil
  • 1 pound of skinless chicken breasts
  • 1/4 tsp. dried thyme
  • 1/2 tsp. sea salt
  • 1/2 tsp. pepper, to taste
  • 6 cups of your homemade chicken stock recipe or 6 cups low sodium packaged chicken broth
  • 2 tablespoons chopped parsley
  • 1 cup egg noodles (may substitute rice or orzo)

Saute the celery, onion, and carrots in the tablespoon of oil for a few minutes.   Add the chicken breasts, thyme, salt, pepper, and stock or broth.  Cook on high pressure for 10 minutes; when done release the pressure quickly.  Add in the chopped parsley and then cook the egg noodles or other pasta or rice in the hot soup.

In addition to being a “comfort” food, chicken soup will fight inflammation, thin your mucous, and hydrate you which will all hopefully fight whatever ails you!

Do you have a favorite chicken soup recipe?  Interested in more soup recipes?